Domain Of The Day: Liim.com

I’ll be honest, I’m starting to have more fun talking about expired domains that suck than I do about ones that are good. Still this daily post is about a domain that catches my eye, and this one caught my eye.

LIIM.com

When I look at a name like this the first thing that I think of is a new Domainer buying this and saying, “awesome, I have a premium LLLL.com.” There are some awesome LLLL.com’s but most of them are real words or popularly used acronyms. You know you’ve found a popular acronym when the first, second, and third page of Google all have companies that use it (okay maybe just the first page…but a really good one will have all three or more).

Unless you really think that the Longmont Institute of Integrative Medicine then I’m not sure who would want to buy this. Yes, there are good LLLL.com’s but that doesn’t mean all LLLL.com’s are good.

Am I being too harsh? Comment and let your voice be heard!

{ 8 comments… add one }

  • Maksim September 20, 2012, 4:16 am

    LIIM is a generic word in Estonian language and the meaning of liim is GLUE. Estonian market is so small, so I’m sure none will be interested to buy the domain.

    Reply
  • Ian September 20, 2012, 8:27 am

    Have to disagree with you on this one, Morgan. Many 4L’s at first glance look horrible but often with a little research that changes. Quite a few with the last or first name Liim and I know that if that was my name I would easily pay thousands for it. If you go to Facebook and search for Liim you will get tired of clicking ‘see more results’ to see when the Liim’s run out…

    Often what is pronounceable or looks good in the US is quite different overseas.

    Reply
    • Morgan September 20, 2012, 9:27 am

      Thanks for sharing @Ian – have you had much success selling first and last names to people? I have always found that first and last names don’t have a lot of liquidity as you really need to find the right buyer, with the right budget, at the right time. I’d be interested to hear your experiences though if you’ve been able to successfully flip these.

      Reply
  • Kevin September 20, 2012, 9:45 am

    I’m going to change my last name…

    Reply
  • Ian September 20, 2012, 11:44 am

    Good first or last names are generally an easy sell. I don’t focus on first or last names by any means but have been fortunate with them in the past. Obviously the more popular the name, the easier the sell. I own a few first names like Josalyn.com, Pauliana.com as well as some last names and even though they aren’t very popular they get steady inquiries.

    Your name is more common so a domain like Morgan.com (owned by Morgan Stanley) or Linton.com (for sale for >10k) are obviously easy flip candidates if the price is right. I have been fortunate enough to not have to solicit end users much so the right buyer is often the one that finds me first.

    Reply
  • Ian September 20, 2012, 11:51 am

    The main point I was unsuccessfully trying to make with my first comment was that often with 4L’s they may look like complete junk at first glance (most probably are) but a little research may reveal some decent value. For instance, the .net or a ccTLD 4L is owned by a multi-million dollar corporation overseas using an inferior domain as their main site, or it’s a weird looking acronym that may work well for a law firm or there is an X in there and a successful Chinese company uses it with a less valuable extension, or like Liim.com there may be around 500 people on Facebook who have that as their first or last name, etc.

    My wife, who is Russian, has clued me in a bit on how a domain that looks horrible to me may look great to someone overseas. For instance a short word with ZH in it may look goofy but could be valuable to one of the 400 million of Slavic descent. First example I can think of is ZHENA which means ‘Wife’ in Russian. The Russian alphabet is a form of Cyrillic script so that is not how they would write ‘Wife’ but this is what the word would sound and look like to English speakers which could translate into some value for Zhena.com. I sold OnyvaDotCom for 6k a couple weeks ago and at first glance that didn’t look like much but fortunately I took some French in college and recognized that I had heard that phrase before. Turns out it means ‘Let’s Go’ in French and was taken in several ccTLD’s so it became an easy investment to make.

    Reply
  • Mike Law September 20, 2012, 12:28 pm

    This is in fact a premium 4L .com. It contains no xyjkzvwuq letters. Being that liim.com consists of only ‘premium’ letters (the most commonly used letters), is somewhat pronounceable and has a more desirable letter combination (consonant vowel vowel consonant) makes its wholesale value a minimum of low $xxx.

    Don’t get me wrong I’m not saying this is a premium domain, a four letter like limb.com would be a premium domain, but liim is technically a premium 4L .com. These categories were defined during the 4L.com buyout when it occurred in 2007 while folks were trying to distinguish what made some 4L.com names more valuable than others.

    Names like these I buy or catch when I can if they are going below wholesale value. Most of the ones I have gotten my hands on have been flipped to other resellers for 3-7x ROI. The reason I flip them is because I am thinking along the same lines as you that finding a true end user (that is willing to pay) is not easy. In fact I have done quite well with similar 4L.coms, even ones that are not all premium letters, but never sold one to an end user. I have sold a 4L.net to an end user though.

    Reply
  • Chris September 20, 2012, 4:33 pm

    To be honest, I have had the most difficult time selling LLLL.com’s in the past. Even those that I thought were “premium” never yielded the results I was hoping for. Ironically, I sold an LLLL.net for more than any of my .com’s. Not something that happens often, but quite interesting.

    Reply

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