DomainTheft.org Announces First Three Partners – Escrow.com, Flippa, and Domain Tools

I am excited to announce some exciting changes and improvements taking place at DomainTheft.org! We launched Domain Theft just over a month ago and I am happy to say that we’ve seen really positive feedback and today I’m excited to announce our first three partners! DomainTheft.org partners have full access to our database and can integrate it into their own platforms to improve security and help prevent the sale or transfer of stolen domain names.

The first three companies to join us in our fight against cyber-crime are: Escrow.com, Flippa, and Domain Tools. These are three companies that we see as major category leaders in their space and after talking with them about the solution we were offering, they were excited to partner with us in our fight against domain theft! Escrow.com is the leading domain name escrow service and one of the most trusted transactional partners on the Internet, Flippa is the #1 Website sales marketplace on the Internet, and Domain Tools is the leader in domain name intelligence.

“DomainTheft.org is a great idea and long overdue.  We are pleased to be able to support safe and secure Internet transactions in any way possible,”
(Brandon Abbey, President of Escrow.com)

You can read more about this announcement in the press release we sent-out yesterday.

Along with the addition of three incredible partners we’ve also been doing customer development to find-out how we can best improve the system. We began surveying users on launch day and now have a month of data on what users like, what they don’t like, and what they would change. We released a survey and sent it around to a number of people who had domains stolen to get an idea of how they would improve the service, and with this data – we have made changes!

  1. No Charge to List Stolen Domains – a month ago we thought the best way to ensure people weren’t trying to submit their competitors domains was to charge a small fee. The idea was that if you were lying and trying to just get a competitor’s name listed as stolen, you probably wouldn’t pay for it. After conducting gathering feedback we found-out that really nobody who had a domain name stolen wanted to pay to list it in our database. It makes sense, they just had a domain stolen…why would they want to add a monthly charge to it? They also felt that our procedure to verify their identity (requiring two forms of identification and a phone call) was more than enough to stop people from fraudulently submitting names from their competitors. So we listened to our users and have completely removed this fee.
  2. Private Listings – a member of the domain community who has good experience recovering domain names recommended that we add private listings. This would mean that someone could list the name in our database but not make it available through our public search and thus only visible to our partners. We added this to our survey and around 15% of our respondents said this would be a useful feature for them – so we added it. You can now choose to list your names publicly or privately in our database.
  3. Company Structure – we are getting ready to make DomainTheft.org a non-profit organization. Our goal with this project is not to make money, but to increase awareness about domain theft and our service. The more people who check our database before buying a domain name (just like you’d check Carfax before buying a used car) the harder it will be to sell stolen domains. The money we receive from partners goes directly into advertising and running the service to increase awareness around domain name theft.

These are the changes we’ve made so far, but there’s more coming along with brand-new features we’ll be announcing soon. We are more excited than ever and from all the feedback we’re getting this services has definitely been needed. It’s something that I am personally passionate about and I can’t wait to share some of the other exciting things we’re doing as we move forward!

{ 19 comments… add one }

  • Paul Goldstone September 2, 2011, 10:04 am

    Congrats Morgan! Those are incredible partners and their integration with DomainTheft.org could benefit many. Continued success!

    Reply
  • Morgan September 2, 2011, 10:05 am

    Thanks @Paul – much appreciated!

    Reply
  • dad September 2, 2011, 11:56 am

    Morgan,
    GREAT! Congrats to you for putting it all together!

    Reply
  • Leonard Britt September 2, 2011, 12:55 pm

    As domains are more widely recognized as valuable assets, attempted domain theft incidences are likely to increase. Attempting to rob a home, car, bank, restaurant or store at a local shopping center requires a physical presence and possible jail time. If someone attempts to hijack an email account or domain and fails, what is the penalty? The online criminal could live anywhere in the world and face no immediate physical danger as a result of their efforts. And today I received another email hijacking attempt (supposedly from AT&T Account Verification Centre)…

    AT&T has discovered series of illegal attempts on your Account from a bad IP Location and will shut your account as it has been flagged as a spam account. You are to fill the form below by clicking on the reply-to button on your page, Filling the Correct Information Carefully and Send to att.net Mail Alert Center:

    Full Name: …………………
    User Name: …………………
    Password:…………………
    Date Of Birth: …………………
    Country: …………………

    This is for your own safety to avoid account termination. Our automated server will keep your details on file as upgraded for the continue using of our service.After following the instructions in the sheet, your account will not be interrupted and will continue as normal.

    Warning!!! Account owner that fails to verify his/her account after two weeks of receiving this warning will lose his or her account permanently.Thanks for your attention to this request. We apologize for any inconvenience..

    Reply
  • Trico September 2, 2011, 2:36 pm

    Hey what happens if DomainTheft.org is stolen?

    Okay just kidding…hopefully. 🙂

    Congrats on those great partnerships.

    Reply
  • Eddie September 2, 2011, 2:51 pm

    Congratulation & good decision on not charging a fee. By making it non-profit, the brand also increases trust and the rest will follow.

    Reply
  • Morgan September 2, 2011, 2:55 pm

    Thanks for sharing this @Leonard, just goes to show how many scams there are going on online!

    @Trico haha that’s funny, and that would be funny (not for me) if DomainTheft.org got stolen, hopefully I’m not jinxing myself talking about it!

    @Eddie Thanks for the positive feedback! Yes, initially the fee was really just to deter people from trying to get their competitors listed. We realized that are verification process is so rigorous that nobody will want to go through the identity verification unless they are reporting a real theft!

    The non-profit piece is important to me. I’ve built around 180 brands over the last four years with a major focus on making money. This is all about solving a problem within our industry and giving back so non-profit definitely makes the most sense!

    Reply
  • Dan September 2, 2011, 3:18 pm

    Hi Morgan,

    Very well done indeed! Congrats!

    “bon voyage” 😉

    Best,
    Dan

    Reply
  • Morgan September 2, 2011, 3:27 pm

    Thanks @Dan – much appreciated!

    Reply
  • Leonard Britt September 2, 2011, 4:08 pm

    Other registrars may have something similar but after the last six weeks of repeated attempts to hijack my email account I decided to implement a security feature available at Godaddy. Most domain portfolios only sell 1-2% of inventory annually. Thus an extra step in the transfer out process is good insurance for the remaining 98%+ of one’s portfolio. With this upgraded protection, one’s Godaddy rep has to contact you specifically via phone before a domain can be transferred out. So even if your email gets hacked, thieves won’t be able to complete a transfer.

    Reply
    • Morgan September 2, 2011, 5:14 pm

      Excellent tip and thanks for sharing it @Leonard – completely agreed!

      Reply
  • Jawed September 3, 2011, 3:30 am

    Great work Morgan and a very important tool for victims of domain theft. I think Sedo and other domain markets should also integrate this database to stop trade of stolen domain names.

    Had sent you a message on FB..:)

    Thanks & Regards,
    Jawed

    Reply
    • Morgan September 3, 2011, 12:23 pm

      Thanks @Jawed – I completely agree!

      Reply
  • Daniel September 3, 2011, 5:04 am

    Best of Luck on you new venture Morgan!!! Your efforts will prove to be a sense of security to all the domaining industry.

    Reply
    • Morgan September 3, 2011, 12:22 pm

      Thanks @Daniel – really appreciate it! This is something I am really passionate about and is definitely much needed!!

      Reply
  • DaVID CLARKE September 17, 2011, 6:30 am

    Hi, this morning I tried to search for a domain name entitled “globalmarketinginnovations.com. When I put in the search in Internic, it reported that there was no match found for the domain, meaning that no person owned such a name. In about 5 minutes I put back in the name and it had an owner who claimed to register August 23, 2011. I found it very strange. and was very disturbed by this.

    Reply
  • Max May 27, 2013, 5:00 am

    Hi Morgan,
    please let me post a comment even after so much time. I have an auction going on, but I forgot to check that the domain was not stolen. I visited domaintheft.org, but it is gone. What has happened? I have not read any article about this very important site now closed.
    Was it sabotaged with false reports, or what?
    Thank you very much if you have information.
    Regards

    Reply
    • Morgan May 27, 2013, 12:36 pm

      Hi @Max – you are always welcome to comment on my blog! 🙂

      Reply
  • Max May 28, 2013, 10:52 am

    Thank you very much Morgan! But do you know nothing about what happened to domaintheft.org?
    (I would not want to see me win a stolen domain)
    Thanks again

    Reply

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