I (almost) sold my first domain through DNWE.com today

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This afternoon I finished a conference call, looked at my email, and saw a notification from Escrow.com, I had just sold a domain. Cool beans, this is part of my normal life and the strange thing about being a domain investor, you never know when a domain will sell.

I logged-into Escrow.com, accepted the transaction and made myself a sandwich. No, I don’t make myself a sandwich every time I sell a domain, that just happened to be the natural course of things today. But I don’t sell enough domains for that not to be possible so now I feel like I should just start doing that…I digress.

Then I got a text from Josh Reason, the founder of DNWE, first congratulating me on the sale, second saying the WHOIS info didn’t match so double-checking if it was my name. I double-checked.

“Doh!” I responded.

I had made a typo, and in the process accidentally listed someone else’s domain (which for the record was better than mine) for sale, and it sold. So I guess technically I did sell my first domain through DNWE, it just wasn’t my own name.

It’s a lesson that we all need to learn the hard way every now and then. Double-check, heck – triple check when you’re typing in a domain name, even if you own the darn thing you still might get it wrong.

I’m a big fan of DNWE, love the UX, love the idea behind it, and Josh is awesome so also really like the mind behind the machine. Thanks to Josh for reaching out to double-check, most services would never do that and this would have been a lot worse. Oh and here’s to me selling one of my own names on DNWE sometime soon!

{ 5 comments… add one }

  • Patricia Kaehler March 27, 2020, 1:33 am

    Questions:
    Why would a company allow someone to list something for sale they didn’t own ??
    Why aren’t they requiring either verifiable whois or verification of ownership – prior to listing ??

    Reply
    • Fat Anon March 27, 2020, 6:06 am

      Which is especially strange since to sign up you have to go through the scrutiny of manual verification.

      Reply
  • George In Miami March 27, 2020, 7:58 am

    Would be appropriate if Josh Reason, the founder of DNWE explains this issue.

    Reply
  • Konstantinos Zournas March 27, 2020, 8:05 am

    Rookie mistake Morgan. Always copy and paste! Always…

    Reply
  • Mike March 28, 2020, 6:06 am

    I agreee they need to verify domains before someone wires thousands of dollars, then has to wait a week to get it back.

    The site is very buggy to date, my guess the main reason it was setup is so is users could get inside deals first that will never see the light of day for the users that actually support the platform.

    Reply

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