I think Supply made the right choice moving from GetSupply.com to Supply.co

I’ll keep this short and sweet. There’s been a big debate happening on Twitter about a company that moved from GetSupply.com to Supply.co and whether people think that was a good idea or not.

I think the founder of the company said it best in his tweet announcing the change:

GetSupply.com changes to Supply.co

What Patrick says is spot on IMHO, if your domain name is Get<something>.com people often think your company is called Get<something>, they have no idea that you’re actually adding the “Get” at the front just to secure the .COM.

I’ve seen this cause so much confusion over the years for so many companies. At the end of the day, if you want to call your company <something> it’s better to own <something>.co/.io/.net, etc if you can’t get the exact-match .COM and still really want to call your company <something>.

When people hear about a company on the domain name Supply.co, they’ll assume the company is called Supply. When people hear about a company on the domain name GetSupply.com, they’ll assume the company is called GetSupply.

Patrick’s company is Supply, so moving to Supply.co makes a ton of sense to me. Just last week Doron, the founder of Efty announced that he sold Bold.co, the company already put up their site and guess what, it’s a company called Bold. I can tell you they’re probably happier with Bold.co than if they got GetBold.com or BoldOnline.com because their company is called Bold.

There are multiple paths you can take when it comes to naming a company and at the end of the day the reality is you don’t need to have the .COM to build a successful company, Zoom built a billion dollar business on a .US and only bought the .COM after they were swimming in cash and there are many more similar examples of companies that have done the same.

Does Supply want to get Supply.com someday, I’m sure they do, but did they make the right move for their business and their brand today, yes they did. Or at least that’s my two cents!

{ 26 comments… add one }

  • BullS October 17, 2019, 6:33 pm

    What the hell are you smoking?

    Show us the traffic stats and all the traffic will go to dot com.

    Reply
    • John October 18, 2019, 7:35 am

      The answer is in your screen name, BullS, as in I don’t believe Morgan actually thinks any such thing at all. I removed him from my daily domain blog reading circuit a while ago. Just happened to catch this almost by “accident.” And there was definitely a reason I say that but I’ve already had a comment removed before, so…

      Reply
  • Snoopy October 17, 2019, 6:46 pm

    They are swapping one problem for another and I think the o.co disaster has been forgotten too soon. The root problem is they have no upgrade path because Supply.com now looks to be a big business, all they are doing here is moving sideways.

    Reply
  • Ethan October 17, 2019, 7:42 pm

    Overstock’s switching to O.co is not a comparative case because O.co is not a brand-matching domain to them.

    Reply
    • Ethan October 17, 2019, 7:46 pm

      I meant to reply to Snoopy.

      Heck, UI design is important, isn’t it? The position of the comment form really needs to be adjusted so that we know whom we are replying to (the post or the last commenter).

      Reply
    • Snoopy October 17, 2019, 7:53 pm

      The problem they had was made very clear,

      “There was a tremendous amount of traffic diverting to O.com and I think we’ve figured out that it was about eight out of 13 people who were trying to visit us through O.co, eight were typing O.com.”

      Patrick Byrne, Former Overstock CEO

      Reply
  • johnm October 17, 2019, 8:05 pm

    What is best for the customer? Is such a change simplify findability for customer/partners? Does the new domain evokes trust and creditability? Could such a change jeoperdize email security, result in bad and links?

    Reply
  • barry felds October 17, 2019, 8:07 pm

    There has been a compounding problem from the beginning. I hope the products are good, as the branding, positioning and name selection have been somewhat Ho Hum.

    The company name ‘Supply’ for a razor company. Why? What’s the point of it?
    Picking the name domain name ‘GetSupply.com’. Why? Was that the best name they could come up with? Why that prefix? Seems all a bit lazy and more Ho Hum.
    Changing the domain name to ‘Supply.co’. Why bother? Seems all to hard trading some problems for another for a net effect of still more problems with the actual name of the company.

    I do hope he was selling a shit load of product before this change.

    Reply
    • Snoopy October 17, 2019, 8:23 pm

      They look to have some decent volume of sales. But the people with Supply.com have grown far quicker and look to have tens of millions in sales now. They got a lot of sales momentum looking at semrush and I’d say the company is 10-20x the size.

      Probably someone should take up the Supply.co’s offer of a bet on SEO, because there is no way he is going to outrank Supply.com. Most people typing in “Supply” would be looking for the toilet people, and I don’t think he realises how big the other company has got.

      Reply
      • Goye Libay October 19, 2019, 1:50 am

        Would be a stupid bet..

        On Google Supply.co already ranks above Supply.com

        So I guess everyone searching ‘supply’ isn’t looking for whatever the other supply co sells

        Reply
    • David October 17, 2019, 9:32 pm

      Have been asking myself the same questions Barry has outlined,
      if you are going to rebrand, why not choose a word that has more relation to razors /
      shave / beard etc and own the .com like most companies do when they take the step
      to rebrand………….. What the word supply in this case has to do with Razors from day
      one is beyond my understanding.
      If i would be the CEO i would find a great word that has to do clearly with my product / market and recognise now was a mistake and correct it quickly, a the end of the day
      if you have a great product the customer will go were you tell him, security, leakage and other points are very important, not being able to buy in the future the .com is a huge
      minus, btw their razors look very nice, enough people in this industry could supply them
      a GREAT Brand

      Reply
  • johnm October 17, 2019, 8:49 pm

    Ranking isn’t within his control, if he wins or not has nothing to do with anything.

    Reply
  • Bobby October 17, 2019, 9:11 pm

    It all comes down to what is more important:
    the new company name/address or traffic loss/divergence to the comparable .com
    what carries more Weight (BEFORE acquisition of the .com)?

    imo, IF the company is able to secure the .com in the future, then the rename was the proper decision.

    Reply
  • Snoopy October 17, 2019, 10:12 pm

    Supply.com has 98 employees on LinkedIn, that domain isn’t buyable.

    Reply
  • Raymond October 17, 2019, 10:20 pm

    If I were them, I would rebrand it.
    Razoz.com. It’s available for sale $2060 now by the owner.

    Reply
  • Richard B Morris October 18, 2019, 2:34 am

    First, I own a few strategic .Co domains with 9Time™.Co being a brand of golf that I’m developing and trade marking. To the “know it all” so called domainers that regularly comment on blogs like this, you’re mostly hot air, and one of the reasons I own DomainEthics.com, a domain I plan to develop some day.

    Back to Supply.Co. Unfortunately Patrick most likely can’t trademark Supply® because it’s way to generic. He can call his company Supply all day long, but he can’t TM it like Smooth9™ that I just bought to give to him. Why would I do something like that? You’ll have to ask Patrick or Jennifer “if” they choose to except it with no strings attached.

    I just bought another .Co domain a few days ago thinking of the risk vs. reward potential of SwingTime.Co. I paid $11 for it, and GD values it at $465…btw, GD values Supply.Co at $10,564.
    It wasn’t until I keyed SwingTime.com into my URL, and it lead to a landing page where the Domain Market is asking for $194,888 for the name. What I find beyond laughable is the so called professional domainers who would say the $11 is spent on SwingTime.Co is/was a waste of my money, and compare it to buying a lottery ticket.
    Morgan etal…i made a few comments on Elliots Blog about this. I told Elliot that ironically I just bought the domain TopNotchWine.com when I happened to notice Elliot’s business is called “Top Notch Domains, LLC”. And somehow that led me to buy TipsyLiquor.com because I always wanted to own a Liquor store. Morgan…my reaearch shows there are over 13,000 liquor stores in California…any of them called, one of the “catchiest” domains I own, Tipsy Liquor?
    Happy Friday Everyone!!!

    Reply
    • David October 18, 2019, 9:24 am

      Ethics starts by not calling people names, for you others opinions can be hot air for others
      their opinions may come from personal experience selling names and years in the
      business.
      Does your experience comes from selling names to existing companies, have you sold
      names developed by Corporations, would be nice to know?
      I’ll share one name i sold to a company with 41.000 employees that they are in the process
      of launching GoExperts.com medium 5 figures.
      The selling price of a .com in any market doesn’t give relevance / value to the same
      name in other extensions.
      I happen to own a number of .com that are fully developed and known businesses
      working out of .net, .io, .co.uk .ru etc and they are constantly sending offers to get
      their .com just haven’t sent any decent offer, btw one just got almost 50 million
      in funding.

      Everything is in the eye of the beholder, I would never go with smooth9 for free or not.
      Razoz.com and many other great options are available, for a small company like this
      that for sure they want to grow also internationally my opinion 100% is to move quick
      to a .com otherwise THEY WILL ALWAYS BE UNDER THE SHADOW of Supply.com
      and that name is the most important asset to that business, in the future if that company gets bought out the new owner the first thing he’ll ask for is that domain.

      Amazon without Amazon.com domain name is just like a broken plastic cup worth 0

      You can read at grandseeds.com how most companies in China to go overseas or when they rebrand would never go with other than .COM a few companies may have
      other extensions but the absolute majority is .com

      Reply
      • Richard B Morris October 19, 2019, 3:26 am

        Ateguy….Ethics are in the eyes of the beholder as well. Referring to you or anyone as a “Domainer” may be a compliment to some while it’s insulting and demeaning to others. Sorry if i offended you, lol

        Moving on…i too think Patrick should have re-branded to something entirely different, and the reason I offered Smooth9.com was because if he didn’t like it, I could use it as part of my 9Time™ portfolio of names that use “9” as a keyword. I’d explain it to you, but you wouldn’t understand like you’ve probably never heard of a “smooth” shave.

        The one thing I agree with you on is that neither name is great for Patrick and Jennifer’s regardless of the extension. Having started, operated and yes NAMED dozens of businesses in my life I’m confident I could have helped. Smooth9.com may not be the perfect off the shelf name, but if you give me a couple of hours I could come up with a half dozen more.

        Finally, I know you don’t think you’re arrogant, but I feel that way about you. And while beauty may be in the eyes of the beholder, so is arrogance…..Enjoy!

        Reply
        • David October 19, 2019, 7:14 pm

          Thanks for your comments, appreciate them.
          Yes….. know well what’s a smooth shave, shaved for many years of my life,
          today I wouldn’t be a supply.co customer because i haven’t shaved for many years.

          Just to remind what you wrote:
          To the “know it all” so called domainers that regularly comment on blogs like this, you’re mostly hot air, and one of the reasons I own DomainEthics.com, a domain I plan to develop some day.

          We live in a World were starting with the Media, people have to think the way they do or simply they don’t agree with you, I believe any opinion deserves respect and anybody has the right to agree or not, this industry has incredible people who have
          been blessed to know many personally and learn from them, I accept that you may
          feel that I was arrogant, I am sorry, thank God the people that know me in person and over the phone know me well.

          Wish supply.co much success but also hope and wish they find a great, short brand and own their niche with a .com
          This is a great industry that has given me great friends and that’s more important than any domain.

          Reply
  • David October 18, 2019, 6:11 am

    For me, neither name is great. If they are going to rebrand, then rebrand. A change of extension, in my opinion, is not a true rebrand. The owner should have taken the two years (which is quite long) to look at a complete brand name change. I would have absolutely stuck with a .com domain. Nothing against .co, but there are so many decent names available in .com. GetSupply is so generic that they could have changed to almost anything.

    Suppyl.com (just an example) is available for hand reg. Perhaps they could have had a fun marketing campaign about switching things up. Close enough to Supply that people could remember more easily. Names like Shaive.com are available as well. (Shameless plug)

    Anyway, what they did will not only require consumers to remember to leave off the “Get” but now they also need to remember to leave off the “m” in com. Tough to do. They could have been more creative. JMO

    Reply
  • John October 18, 2019, 7:30 am

    Gee, Morgan, not exactly feeling a lot of support for what you think about this here.

    Reply
    • John October 18, 2019, 7:31 am

      I.e., what you *say* you think about it.

      Reply
  • Mark Thorpe October 18, 2019, 11:33 am

    Supply.com now sells razors too? Lol
    They can thank Supply.co for the extra traffic.

    Reply
  • dee October 18, 2019, 1:39 pm

    I’m sorry but this is a wrong move in my opinion. It’s just like moving away from prime location to an undesirable location. GetSupply.com is better than Supply.co because most of their traffic will be diverted to Supply.com.

    Reply
  • Alan Dodd October 18, 2019, 5:25 pm

    I feel for this startup.

    Imo, this rebranding to supply.co will have the same effect as o.co rebranding, as Snoopy pointed out.

    Supply.com looks like it’s gone.

    What are the options? They could get a premium dot-com domain and completely rebrand. That comes with a lot of risks. They could lose SEO. It could be a nightmare.

    They could stay with GetSupply.com. I think I’d do this if I were them.

    Taking two word dot-coms, it shows the total importance of naming. Take Godaddy.com as a domain. How much did that cost? I don’t know the story behind it — but was it hand a hand registered domains? That brandname is not changing in a million years. <(It might even live to see Brexit happen.

    There’s an old saying in life — “marry in haste, repent at leisure”.

    Very true when it comes to startups and their domains.

    Reply
  • Michael October 21, 2019, 10:00 pm

    I like Get Supply better easy to say easy to spell. Their brand is Supply so get supply is cool. I think they will regret the .co change! We will all know when they try changing it back.

    Reply
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