So I’ve Just Learned First-Hand The Only Downside To “For Sale” Landers

In my Domaining MBA Monday segment this week I discussed the advantages of using a “For Sale” lander rather than a parked page. I only recommend this in cases where domains are making next-to-nothing parked so you would want to encourage offers rather than try to get as many clicks as possible.

So on Monday I really couldn’t find a single disadvantage to the “For Sale” only lander…and then yesterday I experienced one. Confusion.

One of my domains with a “For Sale” lander happens to be the .COM of a company that uses the .NET. That particular company decided to hold a conference call for some of their clients and asked their clients to RSVP for the call on their website.

So of course, like most people, they went to the .COM rather than the .NET and entered their info. Since the lander asks for their name, email, etc. they just assumed this was the sign-up form for the call they were dialing into. Which means that at around 6:00PM PST yesterday I started getting a flurry of inquiries on this particular domain. I called one of the inquires and spoke to a very nice woman, both of us had no idea that we were talking about two different things…so the conversation went a little bit like this.

Me: Thanks for your interest in xxxxxxxxxx.com, could you tell me a bit more about how you plan to use it?

Her: Yes, I am very excited about this but it is all new to me, maybe you can explain a little more about it.

Me: Sure. Here are some similar sales [listing a few similar sales]. That should give you an idea of the price range this would fall in.

Her: Oh wow, that is really interesting. Where are you finding this data.

Me: There’s a site called NameBio.com that has a searchable database of sales and DNJournal is also a good resource.

Her: Very interesting, well I can wait until everyone else is on the call so we can all learn together.

Me: Sorry, I think you might be confused, I am calling you because you sent in an inquiry about my domain name.

Her: Oh, I thought this was the conference call for xxxxx company.

Me: No, sorry for the confusion but I think you went to the wrong site.

Of course this doesn’t happen every day, and I’m not saying that I think any differently about “For Sale” landers than I did on Monday. However, what I will say is that there is potential for confusion which could mean more inquiries from people who aren’t actually interested in buying your domain.

I found this to be a pretty funny exchange, it felt a bit like an episode of Frasier (one of Daina and my favorite shows!) and I thought you would all get a kick out of it as well. I still feel strongly that if your domain isn’t making any money parked, have it go directly to a “For Sale” lander, just know that some people might get confused and you too could have a call like I did yesterday.

Has this ever happened to you?

 

{ 13 comments… add one }

  • Scott Bender September 18, 2013, 10:40 am

    Morgan:

    Very funny story.

    Do you have any examples of “for sale” landing pages??

    Scott Bender

    Reply
  • Abdu September 18, 2013, 10:48 am

    Happens on a lot of my names frequently…

    Reply
  • james September 18, 2013, 11:08 am

    I do think .whatever will ever have this issue…

    Reply
  • Raymond Hackney September 18, 2013, 11:44 am

    I got to tell you I was laughing when I read the exchange. That’s funny stuff Morgan.

    I have a domain that is an air travel related domain. I get an email and this woman wants to book a ton of business, I tell you if I was in that business that would have been nice. It was not a for sale only lander, but they clicked the link on Voodoo, so you are getting that no matter what the page looks like. If there is a link people are going to click it. Great stuff Morgan.

    Reply
  • Logan September 18, 2013, 12:10 pm

    I get this often on my DNS landers that are not “For Sale-only”. They will click on DNS’s banners at the top of my PPC landers and then use the forms to inquire about orders placed, ask to buy something in a non-English language, etc. The broker often dutifully follows up with the inquiry, only to have a conversation with the prospect much like yours .

    The best one most recently was for the domain name DonateKidney.com. The prospect’s opening offer was $500,000! I was on vacation in Italy at the time and boy was I excited about the opportunity to sell that domain name and just spend a whole year touring Europe. But, I knew it was too good to be true — the DNS broker contacted the prospect and person thought they could sell their kidney for $500,000 or buy a kidney for $500,000 and didn’t understand that they had made an offer on a domain name. Needless to say, no deal, and I’m now back at work in Dallas.

    Reply
  • Vincent Jacques September 18, 2013, 12:41 pm

    Very funny indeed! Sounds like you may have sparked some interest in the one you were talking to as well. Perhaps the next newbie domainer.

    Reply
  • fatih September 18, 2013, 1:17 pm

    after the DNS redesign this happened to me many times.Some ask for product info some for job…

    Reply
  • Ryan September 18, 2013, 1:34 pm

    The one issue I find with DNS landers broker assisted sales are you do not know who is making the offer, having ever piece of info is cruical… I don’t know how DNS is going to get around this issue? Any ideas…

    Reply
  • pb September 18, 2013, 2:47 pm

    I have contact forms on about half of my domains, so I receive misaddressed mails on a daily basis. E.g. today a woman asked me for ability to view “our” security tapes because her dog was stolen close to “our” entrance. Owning only a domain and not the company in question, I sadly couldn’t help much but to forward the mail to the intended recipient.

    Reply
  • Diego September 18, 2013, 3:00 pm

    In Demene.com (biggest Spanish-speakers domains forum), we have a thread with more than 300 posts about this.

    http://www.demene.com/discussion/27525/

    (Only for members, request an invitation if you want to see)

    Most interesting mistakes use to happens at adult domains šŸ˜›

    Reply
  • Jen September 18, 2013, 4:39 pm

    Reminds me of a funny Abbott and Costello episode, “Who’s on first base?”.

    Just curious if you later contacted the company to share this exact story as leverage as to why they should buy this domain?

    I read a story or two where similar experiences have led to actual domain sales.

    Reply
  • craig September 19, 2013, 6:43 pm

    We have ambulancesupplier.com The govt. of Dubai sent a request to tender on a fleet of ambulances. I replied it’s a parked page, we cannot enter a bid. They replied why not?
    It was a huge contract!

    Reply

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