The crypto world is cuckoo for Y.at emoji domain names and I’m confused

Y.at domains

So there’s a new domain name craze going on in the crypto world and it’s not .COM – it’s Y.at. If you’re scratching your head, I’m doing the same but I think I’m starting to understand it a bit more. Today on Twitter one of my fellow apes posted the following tweet, he was pretty jazzed about a Y.at domain he ended up with:

Diamond Hands Apes to the moon Yat

In this case, someone is actually buying a five emoji domain name and it’s not on a .COM, it’s actually a subdomain of Y.at. Now you might be really scratching your head and thinking, wait – if the person who owns Y.at ever decides to just ditch the domain or not renew, everyone that paid money for a Y.at domain, yup – poof gone.

If you want to have your mind blown a little more, I wrote an article about some very pricey Y.at domain sales, here are some highlights:

destiny-emoji-sales

You are reading this right, the rocket ship emoji, followed by the moon subdomain of Y.at sold for $200,000, which is more than domains like Cluster.com, Limit.com, and blockbuster .IO sales like Metaverse.io. Something’s happening here and it’s hard to ignore – a marketing machine is in motion and it has captivated the crypto and NFT community.

So what the heck are people using these emoji Y.at domains for? Well Y.at has a pretty big vision, they want these domains to become your hub online – it’s how people connect with you, and pay you. Here’s the skinny from their website:

Yat lets you use emojis as your universal username and identity on the internet. Imagine being known as πŸ”₯🐍 or πŸ€–πŸ‘»πŸ‘‘ instead of coffeequeen98 or jake2456@emailxyz.com.

By owning a Yat – let’s say πŸŒŠπŸ”±πŸŒ΄ – it’s yours forever. You are the ~only~ one on earth who owns these emojis.

The possibilities are endless with Yat. You can receive payments, use it on your socials, and eventually much more. Your Yat can be used as a link like this: https://y.at/πŸŒŠπŸ”±πŸŒ΄ (click it to see it!) and automatically redirect visitors to any website you want.

(Source – emojis.y.at)

The thing I don’t exactly get is how they can guarantee that “it’s yours forever” – they own the domain name so it’s really theirs forever isn’t it? If you wanted to have something forever, wouldn’t you want to buy the same string of emojis but with a domain name behind it that you own?

Personally, I think this is a lot of marketing and hype, but sometimes that’s what it takes to push for a fundamental change in how people do things. But you guys know me, I’m not a believer in emoji domains whether it’s a Handshake emoji, Y.at emoji, or .COM emoji, I think the habit change isn’t going to happen. I could be wrong (it has happened before maybe once πŸ˜‚ ) but I’m sticking with good old words.

What do you think about Y.at, is this the beginning of something big or just a big bubble? I want to hear from you, comment and let your voice be heard!

{ 4 comments… add one }

  • Paul Webb May 18, 2021, 11:34 pm

    Y.at confuses me as well. Handshake makes sense because you’re owning a TLD. Spending that much money on a SUBdomain? I want these folks with big pockets to buy dsgn.io from me.

    Reply
  • page howe May 19, 2021, 5:47 am

    Well done seeing the flaws, and also the disconnect between whats working now in domain names and digital assets, the disconnect between what we think and what the world buys…

    Marketing Trumps Actuality

    Domain Name World – Small niche market of 10,000 or so insiders who understand power of domain names, and dont market or connect with the public, unless its an inbound lead. Registrar are supposed to market but they just send emails and advertise for monthly recurring revenue hosting products, the true manufacturers (registry operators) dont sell or advertise to the public.

    Real World – Put out a nice picture, make various random assurances your product will be everything great, dont deal with the messy reality, get some early adopters, spread the word…and this is what 6 billion people globally buy.

    And never the worlds shall meet…

    But as to emoji domains, and im a homer for emoji .ws domains names – I own and control my emoji domain names on the TLD thats probably had 90% of all emoji domain registration years cumulatively, .ws is the .com of emoji domains. They have a full time staff and manage the messy details like gender and skin tone options and new emoji very well.

    So a .ws emoji domain name is not a user name or subdomain string on someones elses platform, my .ws emoji domains are on .ws – carried by almost all registrars and offers the most extensive managed list of current emoji – and they work just like IDN’s on the CURRENT internet- thats 100 billion devices. At $5-$10 to start they are priced for first adopters, and renewals are the lowest among the emoji domains trumpeted to the domain community.

    So .ws emoji domains are real domain names, and work on the existing internet (as opposed to handshake) and using the Hybrid Registrar model you can buy and trade and list in aftermarkets (Afternic, Dan) and transfer between registrars and owners.

    But again, my point is we get greatly eclipsed by a good story and some nice pictures ….

    Reply
    • Morgan May 19, 2021, 4:39 pm

      Well said Page and so true, it does feel like .WS was really first to market really championing emojis but Y.at really won the marketing game. Still, long-term I don’t see these catching on either way πŸ€·β€β™‚οΈ

      Reply
  • Rob May 19, 2021, 6:06 pm

    I’m calling “fake” on a lot of the stuff going on in the NFT world.

    $200k for a “To the moon” digital nothingness token? Tens of thousands for mushroom/cat/avocado/other tokens? No way. And then $millions for other instrinsically worthless tokens? Impossible. The average person out there does not have that kind of $$ to waste, and the more wealthy are smarter than to buy that stuff. No, I say all this kind of news is 100% pure psyop to drill into weak minds to CONvince them that fictitious tokens have value, and that “everyone else is doing it” so I should jump in too with a few dollars and make some “easy” money.

    The con of fake digital currencies did not work anywhere near as well as they’d hoped. The next attempt appears to be NFTs.

    Reply

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