When it comes to flipping two-word .COMs, Logan Flatt is on a roll

I always laugh when people say that the only people who make money with domain names are the guys who got started in the early days. When I started in 2007 just about everyone told me I was too late, and another “late-comer” that is making waves lately is Logan Flatt, who has been flipping two-word .COMs for a very healthy profit.

logan-flatt

Back in July Logan went on the DomainSherpa show to talk about how he sold SmartMonday.com for $14,488 after buying it for $69 just three months earlier.

Three days ago Logan announced another solid two-word .COM sale, TheMarc.com which he also bought for $69 but this time back in 2014 and sold last week for $6,800. It’s a great example of the strong value that two-word .COMs continue to have and the opportunities that are out there for new domain investors.

Other well-known Domain Investors like Rick Schwartz, Frank Schilling and Mike Mann have also talked about the names they have purchased recently and flipped for massive profits. Sure, the big name Domain Investors also have incredibly names they bought 10 – 20 years ago but if you look at what they’re selling on a regular basis you’d be surprised how many of them were names that anyone else could have bought in auction if they were willing to make the investment.

All that being said, results like these shouldn’t cause you to rush out and buy as many two-word .COMs as you can get your hands on. You could buy 100 domains for $69 and not sell a single one so it’s really not as easy as many would like to believe that it is. In fact, now more Domain Investors than ever are trying to sell their entire portfolio which usually means only getting pennies on the dollar. Many of these portfolios are full of two-word .COMs, but they’re essentially junk, and sure, many of them also cost only $69.

Rick Schwartz made a good comment on these portfolio sales earlier today:

rick-schwartz-potfolio-sales

It can be all too easy to hear people like Logan talk about their two-word .COM sales and think that all they had to do was buy two-word .COMs for a low price and flip them for a huge profit. Just don’t lose sight of the fact that there are far more “Domain Investors” out there who are trying to liquidate their portfolios and kicking themselves for buying so much junk.

The challenge is developing an eye for what sells. Rick calls junky domains pigeon shit, and knowing what is a steal of a deal for $69 and what is a giant heap of pigeon shit for the same price, well that takes time and experience. The great thing about the domain industry is that if you aren’t sure, you have direct access to the experts who will give you their honest opinion and help you get on the right path.

The biggest mistake you can make is just to buy without listening and learning, yes you’re going to make mistakes, but you can limit the mistakes you make by being humble, asking people what they really think of what you bought, and not getting emotionally attached to your domains.

Congrats to Logan on the slew of solid two-word .COM sales, here’s to the next one which is probably just around the corner!

 

{ 9 comments… add one }

  • steve brady August 12, 2017, 1:32 pm

    Morgan I thought of a .com that has never been registered before, it’s 2-word combination of domains you already own. ClosetMetric.com

    Were you already aware of ClosetMetric.com or is this the first you’ve heard of it?

    Google thinks users are asking where the closest metro station is!

    After reading this article I’m not registering it!!

    Reply
    • steve brady August 13, 2017, 9:10 am

      Morgan,

      Your website ClosetDesign.com from your Aug 2nd EFTY report doesn’t resolve anymore. The whois says Morgan and the nameservers point to EFTY according to DomainTools.

      Only reason I checked it out is because a company named ClosetWorks merged with SpaceMetrics.

      businesswire.com/news/…/Closet-Works-Acquires-Space-Metrics-USA-L.L.C.

      Reply
  • Andrew Hyde August 13, 2017, 6:06 am

    How did Logan market his names? Did he contact end users directly or is one forum better than another? I have several two word .com’s that I have priced way under value, like DallasTech.com and the offers I keep getting are from ‘the poor college student’ looking for a gift at 500.

    Reply
  • Logan August 13, 2017, 6:22 am

    Hi Andrew,

    Per my DomainSherpa.com interview back in May, I am conducting a test this year of simply putting up Uniregistry Market landing pages with high BIN prices. I also list the same names at Sedo and Afternic with a 25% premium to the BIN prices at Uniregistry Market to account for their 20% commission fees. Then, I just sit back and wait for a sale. That’s it.

    The key is to have decent quality names, a large volume of names, a day job, and lots of patience.

    Logan

    Reply
    • Andrew Hyde August 13, 2017, 7:27 am

      Thanks Logan, I have listed on Sedo and Afternic and so far this year sales have been evenly paced. I haven’t tried the Uniregistry Market, but will look into it. I have a day job patience, and only 80 or so names listed for sale currently.

      I would have past over SmartMonday.com questioning what would anyone sell on it. And TheMarc.com, that one reminds me of a saying my Dad used to say, “If you walk into a room and you don’t see who the mark is , the mark is you.” Congratulations on your sales and always appreciate the advice.

      Reply
      • Logan August 13, 2017, 9:57 am

        Yeah, 80 names is not enough, most likely, to many sales. Domain investing is a numbers game. To get more reward, you have to expose more risk to more domain names.

        “questioning what anyone would sell on it” — if someone offered you $2 million for a piece of raw land you own, would you care what they are going to sell on it? Not really. It’s the same with domain names. Who cares?

        The bigger questions to ask yourself are the ones I discussed in my DomainSherpa.com interview:

        1. Are there multiple, large corporations around the world ALREADY using the phrase in a commercial setting?
        2. Do any of them have a federally registered trademark ALREADY on the phrase?
        3. Would the domain name represent an upgrade and/or the absolute perfect domain name for one or more of these large corporations?

        From there it’s: Yes, No, Yes, GO!

        Reply
  • Eric Lyon August 13, 2017, 9:06 am

    Congrats on the sale Logan!

    Rinse and repeat! 🙂

    Reply
  • Joe August 13, 2017, 10:31 am

    Congrats on the sale Logan!

    Reply
  • Michael Delahousaye August 14, 2017, 12:12 pm

    Logan is going to become the Warren Buffet of domain name investing… Patience, Patience, Patience and a day job… Words of wisdom!

    Reply

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