Breaking: Identity.com acquired by blockchain identity startup

identity-com

It’s official, blockchain identity startup Civic has acquired Identity.com, and like many startups trying to land their top choice domain, they never thought they’d get it. In fact, that’s a direct quote from the co-founder and CEO of Civic:

“I never thought we’d get it.”

That’s Vinny Lingham, co-founder and CEO of the blockchain identity startup Civic, talking about the company’s acquisition of “Identity.com” – a fitting web domain for a company built around the idea of putting personally identifiable data in the control of its owners.

To that point, Lingham said he had always thought Identity.com would be an ideal address from which to promote the platform he is building. (Source – Coindesk)

While the final sale price of Identity.com hasn’t been revealed they did note that it wasn’t pocket change, and given that they raised $33M in a token sale last year I’m guessing that means this was a seven figure sale.

Identity.com is already pointing to Civic’s main site, more specifically, an article about the acquisition of the domain and their plans on how they’re going to be using it.

Today, we are very happy to announce a new name for the decentralized identity ecosystem – Identity.com.

Identity.com will be a first-of-its-kind decentralized platform that will open up access to on-demand, secure identity verification. Identity.com is designed to connect users, requesters, and validators around the world to enable reusable identity verification, powered by Civic tokens (CVCs). This ecosystem allows individuals, companies, and other entities to interact easily and safely in the digital world. (Source – Civic.com)

Huge congrats to Civic, Identity.com is an amazing domain and it will likely make a huge impact on their business which is why they were willing to shell out a lot more than pocket change to lock it down. I’m looking forward to seeing how this develops, and it’s pretty easy to remember where to go to look for updates!

{ 4 comments… add one }

  • Sigma July 17, 2018, 10:09 pm

    July is proving to be a great month for premium one word dot-Coms.

    BTW, I found your article on ‘How much should startups pay for a domain name?’ You mentioned offering $350k on a certain DN for a client, but said the domain registrant wanted $7m. You didn’t say if you found another asset for you client. What was the final outcome?

    Reply
    • Morgan July 18, 2018, 8:21 am

      @John – agreed, July is really turning out to be an incredible month for premium .COMs!

      I think you might have been confused in my previous article, here is the paragraph you are referring to:

      So if a startup just raised $1M and they are consumer-facing in a space where getting traffic to their site is critical, spending $150,000 on a domain name might not be out of the question. If they raised $4M – $5M spending $350,000 wouldn’t be as outrageous as you think.

      What I was saying here is that if a startup raises $4M – $5M they could afford a $350,000 domain name but I don’t see anywhere in the article where I mention a domain registrant who wanted $7M for a domain. I think you might be confusing me with someone else? Or maybe I have amnesia! Can you let me know where you read about a registrant that wanted $7M for a domain?

      Reply
      • Sigma July 18, 2018, 8:20 pm

        @Morgan The recent public domain name sales are great news for everyone. I truly believe there will be another short golden age for domain speculators between 2018-2021. I think the next recession (2019-2020) un the heels of the retail apocolypse (2016-2019) will wash away 80% of the nGTLD registries and their over-hyped extensions.

        Google is being fined all over the globe rn. Thus, direct-navigation will become more important again, and premium one & two word dot-Coms will be at an all time high. But eventually, GoDaddy, Huge Domains, corporations and similar corps. will own all domains of premium value as they buyout speculator portfolios becoming Amazon and Wal-Marts of domain names.

        I think I made a mistake, maybe it was not you that had determined a domain had a value of $350-$500k and was rejected by a registrant who wouldn’t budge below $7M. I was reading a bunch of similar articles yesterday…

        Reply
  • Green Jobs July 18, 2018, 4:28 am

    Seems like this Civic.com was a premium domain.

    Reply

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